30-Hour LEED AP BD+C Credentialing Maintenance Program (CMP) Basic Coverage Package #2

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This 30-hour course package will completely satisfy the credential maintenance requirements for LEED AP’s with the BD+C specialty. Included in this package are 30 hours of GBCI approved courses, including six hours of LEED-specific approved for the BD+C specialty. This package should only be taken by LEED AP’s with the specialty of BD+C for regular credential maintenance. (Intermediate - 30 hours).
 
The courses contained in this package are:
• Ethics: Shades of Green Webcast (RV-10465AW)
• Green Building Materials: An Introduction (RV-5014)
• Green Building with Steel - Part 4: Framing With Steel Studs (RV-10229) 
• The WELL Building Standard (RV-11152AW) 
• Green Design: Introduction to Indoor Environmental Air Quality (Based on LEED v4) (RV-10679) 
• Green Design: Introduction to Sustainable Sites (Based on LEED v4) (RV-10681) 
• Green Design: Introduction to Sustainable Water Systems (Based on LEED v4) 
• Green Design: Sustainability and Historic Preservation (RV-10274)
• Green Design: Sustainable Lighting Design (Based on LEED v4) (RV-10684) 
• Introduction to ASHRAE 189.1-2011: Standard for the Design of High-Performance Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RV-10613AW)
• LEED v4: Building Design and Construction (RV-10591AW) 

  • Green Building Materials: An Introduction

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    This 3-hour interactive online course - one in the two-part series "Green Building Materials" - advocates the environmental benefits of green building materials by introducing you to the positive effects of building with environmentally friendly products, made especially with the future in mind.

    Growing concern over the future of our planet makes "Green Building Materials: An Introduction" a must for any professional in the AEC industry. This 3-hour interactive online course advocates the environmental benefits of green building materials by introducing you to the positive effects of building with environmentally friendly products, made especially with the future in mind. You will learn about green building materials and why they are important not only to the environment, but also to humans because they prevent future health problems caused so often by toxic chemicals. You’ll also learn about the economic benefits, common misconceptions, consumer demand, professional responsibilities, and the “look” of green material. This is the first of two courses in a series on "Green Building Materials." This educational offering is also recognized by the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry as satisfying 3 hours of credit toward the required continuing education. (Fundamental - 3 hours).

    Ross Spiegel, RA, FCSI, CCS

    Ross Spiegel, RA, FCSI, CCS, an expert on specifying green products, is an associate at Michael A. Shiff & Associates. He is the co-author of the book "Green Building Materials, A Guide to Product Selection Ross Spiegel, RA, FCSI, CCS, an expert on specifying green products, is an associate at Michael A. Shiff & Associates. He is the co-author of the book "Green Building Materials, A Guide to Product Selection & Specification," which is the basis for several RedVector.com online courses. 

  • Ethics: Shades of Green

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    This three-hour course will discuss why professionals have a green ethical obligation to promote excellence of design and endeavor to conserve and preserve the integrity and heritage of the natural and built environment.

    This three-hour webcast will focus on how our professional ethics are no longer black and white, they are shades of green. Not only do professionals have an obligation to design for the health, welfare, and safety of people they represent; they also have an obligation to safeguard the environment. This course will discuss why professionals have a green ethical obligation to promote excellence of design and endeavor to conserve and preserve the integrity and heritage of the natural and built environment. We will focus on how professional societies and registration boards are holding professionals accountable for sustainable design and planning practices and to consider the environment in everything they do. (Fundamental – 3 hours).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 
    • Recognize the need for sustainable approaches imbedded in Codes of Ethics for professional organizations within the planning, design, and construction industry.
    • Explain the importance of a green ethical approach to the planning, design, and construction process which seeks to avoid depletion of energy, water, and raw material resources for future generations.
    • Develop ethical reasoning to aid professionals to navigate through difficult decisions to create environments that are livable and promote health, safety and well-being.
    • Practice an integrative approach to sustainable practices that seeks to prevent environmental degradation caused by facility and infrastructure developments during their implementation and over their life cycle.
    • Through case studies, comprehend some of the most common sustainable ethical considerations within the planning, design, and construction industry.

  • The WELL Building Standard

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    This interactive three-hour online course introduces the WELL Building Standard and discusses unique "features" (known as “credits” in LEED) to certify projects and gain the credential.

    How well does your building fit your tenants? Do your employees need a place to walk or work out? This interactive online course introduces the WELL Building Standard and discusses unique "features" (known as “credits” in LEED) to certify projects and gain the credential. We will discuss the application of the WELL standard to a hypothetical case study, conducting a feature-by-feature analysis and comparing the building before and after the standard is applied. (Fundamental – 3 hours).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:
    • List the rules of the WELL Building Standard™ (version1) and how to apply them across the three project types: new and existing buildings, new and existing interiors, and core and shell.
    • Define Biophilia, its importance within the building environment, its impacts on human health, and how the MIND section in the WELL Building Standard™ (version1) promotes Biophilia indoors (Feature 88: Biophilia I-Qualitative) and outdoors (Feature 100: Biophilia II-Quantitative).
    • Describe how the FITNESS section of the WELL Building Standard™ (version1) promotes active furnishings within the workplace by illustrating Feature 71: Active Furnishings in a before and after scenario showing a schematic office layout.
    • Describe how the WELL Building Standard™ (version1) effects workplace kitchen and cafeteria design to promote a healthy food culture through illustrating examples from the Nourishment section, including Feature 45: Food Advertising, Feature 46: Safe Food Preparation Materials, Feature 47: Serving Sizes, Feature 50 Food Storage, and Feature 52: Mindful Eating.

  • Green Design: Introduction to Indoor Environmental Air Quality (Based on LEED v4)

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    This two-hour course is intended to address human contribution to climate change that is related to energy use in buildings.

    There is consensus among most scientists that the climate of the earth is changing in the direction of higher temperatures and that some of the change is anthropomorphic (caused by human activity). This course is intended to address that portion of the human contribution to climate change that is related to energy use in buildings. Upon completion of the course, you should be able to understand the ways buildings use energy and how buildings can be designed for high energy performance. You should be aware of activities and plans for improving building designs in the future. You will gain an understanding of the requirements of the Energy and Atmosphere category of LEED v4 Building Design and Construction (BD+C). (Fundamental – 2 hours)

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:
    • Explain the relationship between building energy use and the larger issues of climate change and environmental degradation.
    • Recognize the positions and activities of governmental and professional organizations in this subject area.
    • Discuss sustainability ratings for buildings and understand in detail the requirements of one of those systems, USGBC’s LEED ® Rating System.
    • Recall the current sources of energy for buildings and their environmental effects.
    • Describe in some detail how buildings use energy, the variables affecting how they perform for energy efficiency, and how energy can be produced by buildings.
    • Restate how digital models are used in high performance building design and how commissioning and maintenance affect actual results.
    • Discuss how to implement the LEED v4 BD+C Energy and Atmosphere credits and integrate them into project design.

  • Introduction to ASHRAE 189.1-2011: Standard for the Design of High-Performance Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings

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    This three-hour, introductory course will introduce participants to the ASHRAE 189.1-2011 standard.

    This three-hour, introductory course will introduce participants to the ASHRAE 189.1-2011 standard. The stated intent for the creation of this standard is to specify and provide minimum requirements for the location, design, construction, and operation and maintenance (O&M) of high-performance green buildings. This course will cover the fundamental requirements of the standard; explain how these requirements are met; outline challenges presented by the various components of this standard; and present the relationship of the 189.1 standard with other current standards (e.g., ASHRAE 55, ASHRAE 62.1, ASHREA 90.1) and criterion (e.g., LEED). (Fundamental – 3 hours).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    Upon completion of this course, participants will understand the following:
    • List standards for site design, location, and vehicular and pedestrian traffic.
    • Name means of water efficiency.
    • Summarize how energy efficiency for the welfare of the public can be utilized.
    • Describe how sustainable and low VOC materials can be utilized to maintain the health of the public.
    • Explain why indoor environmental quality is key to maintaining the welfare of the public.

  • LEED v4: Building Design and Construction

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    This one-hour course specifically covers the LEED for Building Design and Construction, known commonly as LEED BD+C.

    Are you aware that Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED Version 4 is now officially adopted by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC)? The goal of sustainable development is to create healthy environments through environmentally responsible planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance. The heart of the sustainable building movement is the USGBC LEED Green Building Rating System for buildings. This course specifically covers the LEED for Building Design and Construction, known commonly as LEED BD+C. This course discusses the background of the LEED BD+C credit rating system and covers recent changes to the system, including the addition of new market sectors, simplified LEED credit submittal requirements, step-by-step reference guide materials with videos and tutorials, and a more intuitive technology platform. Other recent changes include the focus on outcomes to aid in building management, as well as the addition of new impact categories. (Fundamental – 1 hour).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:
    • Discuss the origins of the LEED Building Design and Construction within the USGBC LEED Green Building rating system for buildings.
    • Discuss the differences among the credit rating systems in LEED version 4.0.
    • Recognize the importance of meeting the prerequisites to the categories of LEED BD+C.
    • Identify criteria to best reach LEED BD+C credit rating goals.
    • Explain the intent and requirements of LEED BD+C credit categories.
    • Describe strategies for achieving exemplary performance where applicable.

  • Green Building with Steel - Part 4: Framing With Steel Studs

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    This interactive 3-hour online course - part of the "Green Building With Steel" series - gives you green building with a particular focus on framing with steel studs using Cold Formed Steel (CFS) and the various methods of building exterior and interior frames.

    It makes more sense than ever to use steel as a primary structural building material. It is inherently recyclable and efficient to assemble. That makes it your best choice for sustainable building material. In no time you can be the local expert in green building with steel. This interactive 3-hour online course gives you green building with a particular focus on framing with steel studs using Cold Formed Steel (CFS) and the various methods of building exterior and interior frames. This is the fourth course in the "Green Building With Steel" series. Additional courses are: (1) Material Attributes, Manufacturing, Applications and LEED Ratings; (2) Guidelines for Builders, Trades and Inspectors; (3) Light Gauge Metal Components for Framing; (4) Insulation and Waterproofing; (5) Erecting an Engineered Steel House; and (f) Commercial Applications It is helpful to you to take the first three courses in the "Green Building With Steel" series before beginning this one. (Intermediate - 3 hours). 

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:

    • List the advantages of Cold Formed Steel (CFS) framing.
    • Recognize typical cold-formed steel sections for framing.
    • Understand common steel framing terms.
    • Name the basic steel framing components.
    • Explain how to build an interior non-structural wall.
    • Describe proper steel construction methods and details of assembly.
    • Define proper insulation on steel structures.
    • Discuss the proper tools, screws and fasteners for steel framing.
    • Address how to approach pressure treated wood and steel framing.

    Andrew Manzini

    Andrew Manzini is Vice President, National Green Building, Inc. He is also a Florida Certified General Contractor, NAHB Certified Green Professional, and NAHB National Green Building Standard Verifier. Andy’s previous experience includes executive positions at Architect/Engineering firms in the fossil and nuclear power industry. He is also a management consultant, instructional designer and published author of three management books and dozens of articles. His education includes a BA and MA from Boston University and post-graduate work at Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Management. He is skilled in improving productivity, achieving significant operational improvement through effective teamwork, planning and management.

  • Green Design: Introduction to Sustainable Water Systems (Based on LEED v4)

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    The goal of this online interactive course is to introduce you to a perspective on development and design practices that help professionals support communities in managing and sustaining use of local water resources. Brief overviews of LEED-BD+C v4.0 credits that contribute to improved water quality, reduced water use, management of local stormwater and groundwater resources are included to help orient professionals to practices they may wish to learn more about.

    The goal of this online interactive course is to introduce you to a perspective on development and design practices that help professionals support communities in managing and sustaining use of local water resources. It is often said when discussing sustainable practices that people need to think globally and act locally. This is especially true when dealing with water resources. Unlike any other resource, water cycles through the earth’s environments at global and continental scales, but each step of that journey serves as a highly valued local resource. This course will discuss a sustainable approach to water use and management in buildings, sites, and campuses. It systematically introduces key concepts that help practitioners understand the larger watershed and community water systems that local development practices impact, and the cultural, social, economic, and health benefits communities derive from earth’s water systems. This course also introduces the consequences of conflicts between current development practices and these water systems and emerging developments practices that work better with, and have a lower-impact on, watershed systems. Brief overviews of LEED-BD+C v4.0 credits that contribute to improved water quality, reduced water use, management of local stormwater and groundwater resources are included to help orient professionals to practices they may wish to learn more about. Lastly, the author provides some examples of how strategies introduced in the lesson can contribute to and express the natural, cultural, social, and aesthetic character of places. (Fundamental - 2 Hours)

    At the end of this course, you will be able to:
    • Discuss both larger watershed and community water systems local sites support
    • Explain the impact of local development practices on water systems, local water resource reserves, and water quality
    • Identify the cultural, social, economic, and health benefits communities derive from earth’s water systems
    • Predict consequences of the conflicts between current development practices and these water systems
    • Recognize emerging developments practices that work better with, and have a lower-impact on watershed systems
    • Describe credits from version 4.0 of the LEED-BDC rating system that support improved quality, conservation, and management of local storm and ground water resources.
    • Discuss low-impact practices that support water conservation, recycling, harvesting, and stormwater management – and help meet LT, SS and WE credits in the LEED-BDC rating system that support these goals
    • Recall examples of how these practices provide opportunities to express natural, cultural, social, and aesthetic character of place.

    Tracy Moir-McClean

    Tracy Walker Moir-McClean received her BA and M. Arch from the University of Michigan. Following practice in the cities of Denver, Baltimore, and Ann Arbor she transitioned to an academic career, joining the faculty of University of Tennessee in 1991. Her research explores conceptual interaction between cultural landscape, nature, and region, with recognition of the co-existence and interaction of human and extra-human aspects of landscape and environment. Urban, suburban, pastoral, and wild contexts are considered, as is the possibility that aspects of the aforementioned contexts easily co-exist on the same site. In the College, Prof. Moir-McClean coordinates and teaches the 5th year self-directed project sequence. In addition, she offers seminar courses that explores ethical and philosophical positions related to her research interests. Recent publications include the article: Observations of Faith: Cultural Landscape Context in Design Education included in the anthology: Everyday America: J.B. Jackson and New Work in Cultural Landscape Studies, University of California Press.

  • Green Design: Sustainable Lighting Design (Based on LEED v4)

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    In this 3-hour course, you learn professional lighting design and what tools to use, and are shown how these tools can be applied to real life examples.

    Light is the fourth dimension of architecture. It is molding material in the hands of the lighting designer (architect, interior designer, engineer, etc.), like clay in the hands of the sculptor. Like the sculptor, you need the right tools. The bonus is that good lighting design also yields great energy savings. In this course, you learn professional lighting design and what tools to use and are shown how these tools can be applied to real life examples. In addition, you learn about the different types of LEED credits and how those can be earned and applied to lighting design. This program may be registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation. (Intermediate - 3 hours).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:

    • Organize the steps for developing and implementing a lighting concept project.
    • Explain and identify the concepts that make up the lighting design master plan and its process.
    • Describe and identify lighting technologies and their impacts.
    • Explain and identify how Light, Culture, Space, and Architecture impact lighting design.
    • Differentiate between Lighting and Daylighting.
    • Describe the key points need for creating lighting recommendations Identify the advantages of using scale models.

    Julle Oksanen, CIE, IALD, IES, ELDA, OISTAT

    After graduating P.E. and Music world, 30 years experience on lighting - Professor in USA, teacher and examiner in UK, China and Finland - consult in PhD program UK, founder of "Light & Space Academy, The Finnish Mobile University" together with Professor Hannu Tikka -  Taught in USA, China, Russia, Poland, Japan, Singapore and UK. - Principal of Julle Oksanen Lighting Design Ltd, offices in Espoo and Helsinki - Projects: Opera Houses in Turkey and Norway, Cathedral as concert hall in Germany, KUMU museum in Estonia, Telenor headquarter glass building in Oslo Norway, Stockmann shopping mall, Helsinki, Harbours in Shanghai, Aland and Vuosaari Helsinki, Z58- park in Shanghai, Amphitheatre in Ankara Turkey, e.t.c. - Grants: Finnish Cultural Foundation and Greta & William Lehtinen's Foundation - Research: "Extraterrestrial lighting", "Museum Lighting and protection against Radiation Damages", sun simulators, UTZeroEnergyHouse, e.t.c. - Awarded in over 20 design competitions - Designed luminaires for Fagerhult, iGuzzini , Louis Poulsen, Philips, Se’elux, - x-member: CIE, IALD, IES, ELDA, OISTAT - member of Punavuoridesign Ltd and Architetural Society in Finland - Author for more than 30 books, booklets and articles in international publications such as Introluce, Architectural Lighting, Luce, and Professional Lighting Designer - Co- founder and x-Editor in chief of the Finnish magazine Valo (light) - PE + Master of Science in Landscape Architecture and PhD student
     

  • Green Design: Introduction to Sustainable Sites (Based on LEED v4)

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    This course provides students with the conceptual foundation necessary for exploring many aspects of environmentally progressive site design. Aspects of site sustainability covered in the course include water, solar environment, natural ventilation, transportation, and civic patterns.

    This course provides students with the conceptual foundation necessary for exploring many aspects of environmentally progressive site design. Aspects of site sustainability covered in the course include water, solar environment, natural ventilation, transportation, and civic patterns. Each is considered at a variety of scales ranging from the individual parcel to the neighborhood and placed within larger regional and global contexts. In this way, students are equipped to immediately begin making ecologically informed decisions about the site design of their projects, while simultaneously preparing themselves for further, more detailed study of various issues related to site sustainability. (Fundamental - 1 Hour)

    At the conclusion of this course, you will be able to:
    • Recognize a broad overview of issues impacting the site environment
    • Recall several factors that inform sustainable site selection
    • Identify beneficial aspects of the site environment, which should be admitted and enhanced, and detrimental aspects of the site environment, which should be excluded or ameliorated
    • Evaluate the relationship, across multiple scales, between the impacts of a building project and various natural phenomena and social constructs

    Ted Shelton

    Ted Shelton is an architect whose work and research are focused on the integration of design and technology with an emphasis on green architecture. He holds a BArch from the University of Tennessee, a MArch in Urban Design from the University of Oklahoma, and a MPhil in Environmental Design in Architecture from Cambridge University. He was a Fulbright Fellow in Estonia where he investigated how architecture has been renovated, adapted, and reused over the last century in repeated efforts to exert political and cultural influence. Prof. Shelton is the recipient of a research grant from the AIA National Board Knowledge Committee for his project Greening North Knoxville: Visualizing Sustainability in Urban Conditions. Working with colleague, Prof. Mark DeKay, he received an Ecological Literacy in Architectural Education Award from the AIA National Committee on the Environment and the TIDES foundation.

    Prof. Shelton holds NCARB certification and is a LEED Accredited Professional. His professional experience includes work as a project manager and project architect for the Miller|Hull Partnership in Seattle where he worked on projects that garnered honor awards from AIA Seattle, AIA Northwest and Pacific Region, and an AIA Top Ten Green Projects Award from the National Committee on the Environment.

    Along with Prof. Tricia Stuth, Prof. Shelton is a partner and co-founder of the firm curb, which is devoted to creating architecture that is well-designed, sustainable, and intimately tied to its place. They were winners of both the Plan Section Sentence Competition and the HOME House Competition and semifinalists in the Kielder Observatory Competition sponsored by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). Their work has been recognized with merit awards from AIA East Tennessee, AIA Tennessee, and AIA Gulf States Region and been published in ARCADE: Journal of Northwest Architecture and Design, the Journal of Architectural Education, and HOME House: the Future of Affordable Housing.

    Prof. Shelton is also a partner in Applied Research - a collaborative design team of University of Tennessee faculty members from the College of Architecture and Design. Combining the research interests of four faculty members, the group advances an architectural discourse by focusing on several key areas that include green design, material and construction technology, adaptive reuse, urban and community development, and spatial poetics. Applied Research was a finalist in the Jefferson Heights Tomorrow Sustainable Housing Competition for the design of environmentally progressive infill housing in Chattanooga, TN.